Marching and talking to yourself

Does technology change how we move our bodies?  

zoom screen from Macbeth Os Satyros

In a hurry? Read the short version

click here

The spades were entrenching spades. As you can see, the straight, plain oblong French one on the left is quite a different beast from the angled, pointy British one with its handle attached at 90 degrees.
 

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Comments:

Thank you so much Peter for your kind comments! Once one starts looking at the world in this way, it’s fascinating what you see.

Christine Evans-Pughe - 2022 06 10

Fascinating article about how technology influences our ways of walking, marching and looking around.  I love the phrase “the Pas de Deux” of COVID, which art all my neighbors have quickly mastered.  Congratulations.

Peter_G_Moll - 2022 05 20

We’ve had some wonderful, insightful, thoughtful comments from our Facebook followers about this article.

Astrid Burgmann Wennerholm (raised in Sweden by German parents) commented: “I find that very interesting; being born and raised in one country, but with heritage from another, I can pick out my heritage country(wo)men without hesitation. It’s something about posture and how they acknowledge their surroundings, but I could not point at exactly what it is. But it never fails.”
 
Alan Bennett talked about how French ballet dancers don’t move the same way as Russians. He commented: “I grew up in family of dancers, an art form I have always deeply admired, and with which I am familiar with, in a non technical way. Ballet as we know it today was developed largely in France, but I find Russians often have a more robust way of dancing. A parallel can be found in choirs: Russians are legendary for their basses, and I often feel more overall vocal roundness in their choral production. This is not a value judgement, but I am discussing non-verbal attitudes, which seems to be the thread here.”

And Jay Mann, gave his insight into language: “If you jump to language and the physiological formation of words, the same holds true. People who grow up with Asian languages don’t form words and sounds the same was as westerners.”

Thank you.

Christine Evans-Pughe - 2022 05 03

Reading mouse

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